Why feature switches?

The key feature of Dolstagis.Web is that it builds the concept of feature switches and Branch by Abstraction right into its core. To anyone who recalls the position that I adopted three years ago in The Great Feature Branch Debate, this will no doubt come as a bit of a surprise. Am I jumping the shark here?

Not really. I may have been objecting at the time to the black-and-white “feature branches bad, feature toggles good” line being adopted by Martin Fowler and his ThoughtWorks colleagues, but my own opinion is somewhat more nuanced than the polar opposite of “feature toggles bad, feature branches good.” There are actually a lot of clever things that you can do with feature toggles:

  • You can set them to flip at a specific date and time, for example, if you want to launch something at a conference.
  • You can have them go by IP address. For example, country-specific features.
  • You can use them for A/B testing.
  • You can use them to turn off features and degrade your site’s performance gracefully under load.
  • You may occasionally have a feature that needs to be turned off in order to perform a specific upgrade.

The problem with feature switches is that when they are used as an alternative to branching and merging, you are regularly deploying code into your production environment that you know for a fact to be buggy, immature and incorrect. If your feature switches aren’t properly architected, this can end up being exposed to the general public — with disastrous results. Breaking your tasks down into small user stories can help, but this is not always the case.

The commonest mistake here is that your feature switch doesn’t switch everything. On an ASP.NET web application, for example, it may switch out your controllers, or your routes, but you will still have the same views, the same JavaScript, the same CSS and the same images and other static assets available for both the “on” and “off” states. It’s difficult to turn static assets on or off when by default they’re all served up by IIS from your web application’s filespace.

Dolstagis.Web gets round this problem quite simply by requiring you to expose your static files and your views explicitly in your feature definition classes. If it hasn’t been added, it won’t be shown: it’s as simple as that. In fact, you aren’t even limited to using your application filespace: you could just as easily include your static files and views as resources within your assembly. You can even have the feature that you are toggling in a separate assembly altogether, and modify your build process so that your production version doesn’t even have a copy of the immature and buggy code.

Of course this doesn’t guarantee you that you’ll get your feature switches right, and there are still ways in which you can get them wrong, but hopefully this approach will help to make it easier to avoid running into problems.