The Anaemic Business Layer

The three-layer architecture, with your presentation layer, your business layer and your data access layer, is a staple of traditional .net applications, being heavily promoted on sites such as MSDN, CodeProject and the ASP.NET forums. Its advantage is that it is a fairly canonical way of doing things, so (in theory at least) when you get a new developer on the team, they should have no trouble in finding where everything is.

Its disadvantage is that it tends to breed certain antipatterns that crop up over and over and over again. One such antipattern is what I call the Anaemic Business Layer.

The Anaemic Business Layer is a close cousin of the Anaemic Domain Model, and often appears hand in hand with it. It is characterised by business “logic” classes that don’t actually have any logic in them at all, but only shunt data between the domain model returned from your ORM and a set of identical model classes with identical method signatures in a different namespace. Sometimes it may wrap all the calls to your repository in catch-log-throw blocks, which is another antipattern in itself, but that’s a rant for another time.

The problem with the Anaemic Business Layer is that it makes your code much more time consuming and difficult to maintain, since you have to drill down through more classes just to figure out what is going on, and you have to edit more files to make a single change. This in turn increases risk because it’s all too easy to overlook one of the places where you have to make a change. It also makes things restrictive, because you lose access to certain advanced features of your ORM such as lazy loading, query shaping, transaction management, cross-cutting concerns or concurrency control, that can only properly be handled in the business layer.

The Anaemic Business Layer is usually symptomatic of an over-strict and inflexible insistence on a “proper” layered architecture, where your UI is only allowed to talk to your business layer and your business layer is only allowed to talk to your data access layer. You could make an argument for the need for encapsulation — so that you can easily change the implementation of the methods in the business layer if need be — but that’s only really important if you’re producing an API for public consumption by the rest of the world. Your app is not the rest of the world, and besides, those specific changes tend not to happen (especially for basic CRUD operations), so I’d be inclined to call YAGNI on that one.

The other reason why you might have an Anaemic Business Layer is that you’ve got too much going on in your controllers or your data access layer. You shouldn’t have any business logic in either, as that hinders testability, especially if you’re of the school of thought that says your unit tests shouldn’t hit the database. But if that’s not the case, then it’s time to stop being so pedantic. An Anaemic Business Layer serves no purpose other than to get in the way and slow you down. So ditch your unhelpful faux-“best practices,” bypass it altogether, and go straight from your UI to your repository.